Military Veteran Trucking Jobs

shutterstock 122649784 300x300 Military Veteran Trucking JobsMotor carriers across the country are interested in hiring military veterans to fill open trucking jobs. Starting a career as a truck driver is often the smoothest transition you can make from active duty to civilian life. Here’s what makes military veterans and trucking jobs a match made in heaven.

Trucking Companies Vie for Military Veterans

You make an ideal truck driver candidate because of the skills you learned in the military, and trucking companies recognize that. You are committed to what you do and have an excellent work ethic and leadership skills. In addition, you know how to work independently, adjust to ever-changing situations and remain aware on the road.

Trucking companies constantly look for new, high-performance recruits with a deep passion for high ethical standards and customer service. You probably didn’t realize it at the time, but much of what you did in the military prepared you for trucking jobs.

Military Veterans Thrive in the Truck Driving Environment

Military service requires a certain personality; similarly, trucking jobs aren’t for everyone. It’s nothing like working a traditional office job, which probably excites you. You’re used to being in on the action, and doing important work out in the field. Being on the road and in command of your own truck gives you a sense of freedom that working in a cubicle never will.

Transitioning from the Military to Civilian Life

CDL training is the only thing standing between you and your new trucking job. If you were honorably discharged from the military, you might even qualify for reduced training costs at a CDL school near you. In some cases, if you were a heavy equipment driver in the military, your credentials carry over to civilian life and you don’t even need to attend CDL school to become a truck driver.

If you begin your transition immediately, you can be on the road with your new trucking career only 45 to 60 days after leaving the military. To discover which motor carriers are looking to fill trucking jobs in your area, please visit the Jiggy Jobs website, and check the blog often. Then, learn more about the trucker lifestyle by finding Jiggy Jobs on Facebook and Twitter.

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Top 5 Longest Interstates in the U.S.

shutterstock 114034636 300x198 Top 5 Longest Interstates in the U.S.U.S interstates are the fastest way to get across the country by road. They’re also the roads you’ll see most packed with ­trucks driving to their destinations. Have you ever considered which interstates take you all the way from the west coast to the east? Only a handful of them do, and they are the longest interstates in the U.S.

I-90: Seattle, Washington to Boston, Massachusetts (3,020 miles)

While driving along I-90, you have the chance to soak up plenty of sites. Take a jaunt down to see Mt. Rushmore near Keystone, South Dakota, or head just a little further east to Buffalo Gap National Grassland. Travel through the heart of Chicago on your way to Cleveland, and make your way up along Lake Erie. It’s a beautiful stretch of road that takes you all the way to Boston.

I-80: San Francisco, California to Teaneck, New Jersey (2,899 miles)

Not far from the starting point in San Francisco, stop by the Donner Party Monument in Tahoe National Forest. Try your luck at a Reno casino, and then tour the Airfield Museum in Wendover, Utah. Further east is Iowa 80 in Walcott, Iowa, the largest truck stop in the world. Obviously, this is a must-see location for anyone in truck driving. The Yankee Woods in Illinois is a beautiful site, as is the Brecksville Reservation in Ohio. Stay on I-80 and eventually you’ll make it all the way to New Jersey.

I-40: Barstow, California to Wilmington, North Carolina (2,555 miles)

The Mojave National Preserve is a beautiful site as you drive across southern California. Further along I-40 is Kaibab National Forest, which surrounds Flagstaff, Arizona. The interstate takes you straight through the Laguna Indian Reservation and on to Albuquerque, New Mexico where you can tour the Kirtland Air Force Base. Eventually, you pass through Oklahoma City, Little Rock and make it to Wilmington.

I-10: Los Angeles, California to Jacksonville, Florida (2,460 miles)

This interstate passes through notable locations such as Morongo Golf Club at Tukwet Canyon; Phoenix, Arizona; El Paso, Texas along the Mexican border; Fort Stockton, Texas where you can see restored frontier fort sites; and Blackwater River State Forest in Florida. Next stop, Jacksonville!

I-70: Cove Fort, Utah to Baltimore, Maryland (2,153 miles)

This is the only interstate on this list that doesn’t stretch from coast to coast. Stop at notable locations such as Fremont Indian State Park and Museum in Utah; Vail, Colorado for some skiing; Kansas City, Kansas; Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge in Missouri, Egypt Valley Wildlife Area in Ohio; and arrive in Baltimore.

The shortest interstate is I-97 from Annapolis to Baltimore, Maryland, a measly 17.62 miles.

To discover which truck driving jobs are available with routes along these famous U.S. interstates, please visit the Jiggy Jobs website, and check the blog often. Then, learn more about truck driving and the trucker lifestyle by finding Jiggy Jobs on Facebook and Twitter.

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Top 10 Reasons My Trucking Job is Better Than Your Job

shutterstock 160107908 300x214 Top 10 Reasons My Trucking Job is Better Than Your JobMy trucking job is better than your job. Don’t believe me? Here are 10 reasons why:

  1. While you’re stuck staring at the same cubicle wall every day, the view out my window is constantly changing.
  2. I can listen to whatever music I want – and sing along at the top of my lungs – without bothering anyone.
  3. You deal with office politics and drama on a daily basis, which gets in the way of your productivity. With a trucking job, there’s no such thing as office drama.
  4. No one ever steals my lunch from the break room fridge.
  5. I get paid to tour the country and visit amazing sites that you have to take time off of work to see.
  6. I probably made more money in my first year as a truck driver than you did your first 10 years out of college, and I don’t have the debt of a four-year degree weighing me down.
  7. I don’t get paid whatever salary my superior thinks I deserve; I determine exactly how much I earn by the amount I drive.
  8. Every day is Bring Your Dog to Work Day – and Fido is better than any coworker I could ask for!
  9. I feel free and independent in my trucking job; when was the last time you felt freedom at work?
  10. When you’re stuck in traffic during your morning commute and see you me in the big rig beside you, know that I’m getting paid and you’re not.

Plenty of people feel stuck in a dead-end career that doesn’t make them happy or pays less than they deserve. You may be sick of the monotony, but you might assume you have nowhere else to turn. You’re afraid to leave the comfort zone you have established for yourself.

It’s time to take matters into your own hands! Did you know you could get started with a new trucking job – and all the perks that come with it – after just a few weeks in CDL school? Dive in head first with full-time classes or ease yourself into the transition with weekend courses so you can keep making money at your old job until you’re ready to switch to your trucking job.

To find out what the nation’s top carriers are looking for in new recruits, please visit the Jiggy Jobs website, and check the blog often. Then, learn more about what drivers are saying about their trucking jobs by finding Jiggy Jobs on Facebook and Twitter.

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Carrier of the Month | Pride Transport

Jiggy Jobs’ July carrier of the month is Pride Transport, a family-owned-and-operated refrigerated carrier located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Just imagine a truck driving company whose president, Jeff England, gets behind the wheel of a big rig weekly just to stay in touch with drivers and what the overall driving experience is like. He garners useful information from his time on the road and won’t send drivers to unkempt facilities that he has personally delivered to.

The novelty of Mr. England’s decision to drive once or twice a week is one of the main reasons Pride Transport is so successful, both in terms of keeping drivers happy and satisfying customers.

About Pride Transport

 Carrier of the Month | Pride TransportAfter working in the transportation industry for 20 years, Mr. England founded this Carrier of the Month in 1979. Today, the family-oriented and 100 percent driver-supportive company is based in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Pride Transport is enjoying an unprecedented 60 percent growth rate. The company attributes its success to its continuing diversification in services, which today include transporting frozen food, produce, pharmaceuticals, hardware, auto parts, sports gear and many other commodities.

Pride Transport has several divisions. As part of its diversification, the company recently started offering flatbed transportation services. The plan is to have 21 flatbeds by the end of 2014.

Working for Pride Transport

  • Who can drive for Pride Transport? The motor carrier only hires company drivers. Recent CDL truck driving school graduates are encouraged to apply. An in-house training program is perfect for starting a new career, and a refresher program gets drivers with less recent experience up to speed with current laws and regulations.
  • What are the routes like? Routes are located primarily in the West, but deliveries do encompass all 48 continental states when needed.
  • How is the pay? Drivers averaged $52,000 last year with some earning up to $75,000.
  • How is the equipment? No truck in the fleet is older than 14 months.
  • What is the culture like? It’s very friendly and personal. At Pride Transport, drivers aren’t just numbers and statistics. In fact, Director of Retention Steve Schelin knows every driver’s name.
  • Are drivers well respected? Mr. England says something interesting to his office employees every week at their Monday morning meetings: “Without all of them, I don’t need any of you.” He is referring to company drivers who are the backbone of Pride Transport, making it clear that it’s nothing without the hardworking men and women who drive the company forward.

If this Carrier of the Month looks like the perfect opportunity to get into the trucking industry, please visit JiggyJobs.com today and apply for a truck driving job with Pride Transport. Then, learn more about what’s new by finding Jiggy Jobs on FacebookTwitter, Google+LinkedIn and YouTube.

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Top 5 Trucking Industry Shows

shutterstock 127850414 300x200 Top 5 Trucking Industry ShowsTrucking is a huge industry in America. It’s the backbone of the economy, the method by which homes are built and store shelves are filled. If you’re passionate about your place in the business, learn about the top five trucking industry shows so you can decide which ones to attend.

Mid-America Trucking Show (MATS)

As the largest annual heavy-duty trucking show in the world, MATS is a must-attend event for anyone in the transportation industry. Guests enjoy face-to-face interactions with industry representatives and truck driving professionals, learn about the latest industry technology and glean information about getting started in the industry.

MATS started back in 1972 with 4,000 visitors. Last year more than 80,000 people attended. The next MATS event is scheduled for March 26-28, 2015 in Louisville, Kentucky.

Great American Trucking Show (GATS)

GATS, an all-encompassing convention for trucking professionals, has something for everyone. Heavy-duty truck drivers – including owner operators, company drivers and private fleet owners – can gain valuable insights by attending this trucking show.

More than 500 exhibitors set up booths in the 500,000-square-foot exhibit space in the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas. The convention is held here annually, and the next GATS event is coming right up on August 21-23, 2014.

Walcott Truckers Jamboree

Iowa 80 Truck Stop, the world’s largest of its kind, is home to an exciting show called the Walcott Truckers Jamboree. The event celebrates America’s truck drivers and gives attendees the chance to learn something new about big rigs. Expect to see an antique truck display, Super Truck beauty contest, 175 exhibitors, carnival games, live country music, fireworks and much more.

The Truckers Jamboree has taken place annually since its inception in 1979. The next event is right around the corner, scheduled for July 10-12, 2014. Admission and parking for all events is free, so be sure to stop by if you’re in the area.

Expedite Expo

This is the only trucking tradeshow that focuses exclusively on expedited trucking. The Expedite Expo teaches attendees about today’s newest trucks, career opportunities and products geared specifically toward medium- to heavy-duty truck owners.

The Expedite Expo launched in 2001 and is free to all attendees. The event is held in the Roberts Convention Centre in Wilmington, Ohio and is scheduled for July 25-26, 2014.

Overdrive Pride & Polish

This truck beauty show is held in conjunction with MATS along with four other truck shows across the nation (St. George, Utah; La Crosse, Wisconsin; Crossville, Tennessee; and Wildwood, Florida). The Overdrive Pride & Polish truck beauty contest is open to anyone with a full- or part-time working big rig.

Jiggy Jobs is proud to attend MATS and GATS each year. If you’re planning to be at either event, be sure to stop by our booth and say hello. For more about the best trucking industry shows, visit the Jiggy Jobs blog. Then, find us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn to learn what ­truck drivers are asking about.

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Expediters, the Other OTR Truck Driving Group

shutterstock 68581444 300x200 Expediters, the Other OTR Truck Driving GroupExpedited trucking is a specific niche of OTR truck driving that doesn’t get the attention it deserves. If you’re thinking about becoming a truck driver but you’re not sure which type of job is the best, consider the differences between regular OTR and expedited trucking.

Lifestyle

  • OTR truck driving: Both types of trucking jobs require you to be away from your home for three weeks or more at a time, but with OTR, drivers almost never spend time sitting around. There may be an occasional long wait as freight is loaded or unloaded, but usually, the OTR driver is either on the road or taking time off according to hours of service (HOS) regulations.
  • Expedited trucking: Once the driver makes an expedited delivery, it may be hours or even days before the next load is ready. When it is, the driver is notified and may be required to drop everything and pick up the load immediately. That’s what expedited trucking is all about – getting time-sensitive deliveries (such as flowers and live lobsters) to their destinations as quickly as possible.

Income

  • OTR truck driving: Most OTR drivers are paid by the mile and almost never have to unload their own freight. Starting rates vary, but the more experience drivers gain, the more money they can earn.
  • Expedited trucking: The exact same route as an OTR delivery pays more per mile if it’s expedited. The load is time-sensitive, and shippers and receivers are willing to pay more to ensure their cargo is top priority. This means expedite drivers earn more per mile than OTR drivers. That’s one reason lobster is so expensive, especially if you buy it inland.

Equipment

  • OTR truck driving: Quality OTR trucking companies offer some of the best equipment available. Company drivers can expect their trucks to be no more than three years old with some of the latest technologies available. After all, OTR drivers live out of the truck for weeks at a time, so carriers are careful to provide excellent accommodations for their drivers. If a truck needs any work, most companies won’t hesitate to get right on it. Of course, owner operators choose the truck they purchase and are responsible for maintenance and upgrades.
  • Expedited trucking: Time-sensitive shipments are often completed in smaller loads, which is one reason they cost the shipper more. The trucks still feature walk-in sleepers, but they have smaller cargo areas. Expedited truck drivers are usually owner operators, so they are responsible for leasing a vehicle with the features they want.

These are just the main differences between OTR truck driving and expedited truckers. To learn more, please visit the Jiggy Jobs blog. Then, find us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn to learn what topics ­truck drivers are asking about.

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More to Trucking than Just the Big Rig Rolling Down the Interstate

shutterstock 116173402 199x300 More to Trucking than Just the Big Rig Rolling Down the InterstateWhen people think about trucking, an image of a big rig rolling down the interstate is probably what first comes to mind. However, over-the-road trucking is just one aspect of the transportation industry. Take a look at this and other jobs that keep freight rolling from coast to coast.

Over-the-Road

This classic trucking job usually entails staying out on the road for three weeks or more at a time. That’s why it’s usually the best type of job for single men and women with no children or older couples whose children have left the nest.

OTR is more than just a job – it’s a lifestyle. You spend most of your time traveling from coast to coast, never quite knowing where your next route could take you. It’s a grand adventure, like being a paid tourist, which appeals to many people in the transportation industry.

Warehousing

This job still involves working behind the wheel of a big rig, but because you only move goods locally, you can typically expect to be home every night. It’s a huge benefit for husbands and wives or mothers and fathers who want to work in the trucking industry.

Like OTR, warehouse truck driving requires a commercial driver’s license. Depending on the type of goods you transport, you may need a special endorsement, such as tanker or HAZMAT.

Intermodal

The driver shortages currently plaguing the trucking industry have prompted shippers to consider intermodal freight shipping as an alternative to OTR. An intermodal truck driver doesn’t drive goods all the way across the country; instead, the truck connects freight delivered on ocean liners to railroad stations.

In intermodal transportation, freight makes the brunt of its journey via train. Then, when it’s within 50 miles of its destination, trucks carry freight the rest of the way. This is a less expensive option for shippers, greener for the environment and better for drivers who don’t want to be away from home.

Expedite

This special trucking-industry niche refers to drivers who make time-critical deliveries. It typically involves driving a smaller truck without a trailer. This allows for better fuel economy, resulting in more income on fewer miles for owner operators.

Drivers in this niche can expect to operate great equipment, work with top-notch carriers, earn a great living and enjoy ample time off. Some of the top expedited fleets are FedEx, Panther, UPS Express and Landstar Express.

To learn more about trucking jobs in these categories that might interest you, please read more on the Jiggy Jobs blog. Then, find us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn to learn what topics ­truck drivers are asking about.

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Top 5 Exercises To Get Your Butt In Gear

shutterstock 152853110 300x200 Top 5 Exercises To Get Your Butt In GearLike many other professionals today, ­truck drivers spend their entire working time sitting down. Unless you make it a priority, exercise is easy to neglect. Start a healthy habit today by adopting these top five exercises for ­truck drivers.

  • Walking: Here’s an exercise that immediately improves your health without making you hot and sweaty. Walk for 20 or 30 minutes at the end of your day,. Use the time to contemplate, call home or listen to your favorite music.
  • Stretching: Your muscles tighten up after hours behind the wheel. Every time you stop for food or a bathroom break, take a few minutes to stretch. This gets the blood flowing and helps you stay limber.
  • Push-offs: These exercises are essentially vertical push-ups for ­truck drivers. Stand a few feet from your truck and lean forward with your arms outstretched until your hands meet the truck. Bend and straighten your elbows as if you’re doing push-ups to work out your back and shoulders. Repeat as many times as you can. To track your progress, keep a record of how many reps you can complete.
  • Bicep curls: Keep a set of dumbbells in the cab to do bicep curls at the end of the day. Lifting a jug of milk works, too. Other arm exercises that require nothing more than hand weights (or milk jugs) include tricep kickbacks, shoulder presses, upward rows and front raises.
  • Bicycling: If you have room to store a bike in your cab, you have the perfect machine to get some exercise and sightseeing in at the end of your day. Be sure to take a GPS with you if you’re in unfamiliar territory so you can make it back to your truck safely.

Talk to your doctor about your personal health and fitness needs before you start a new exercise program. For more useful tips for ­truck drivers, please visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then find us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn to learn what topics ­truck drivers are asking about.

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Top 8 Devices Every Truck Driver Must Have

Today’s truck drivershutterstock 190726046 231x300 Top 8 Devices Every Truck Driver Must Have is more tech savvy than ever before. If enjoy having the latest gadgets at your disposal – as well as tried and true truck driving tools – you need to pursue the top eight devices that every truck driver must have.

  1. GPS: There’s no need to waste time with paper maps today thanks to GPS. Special versions made just for the trucking industry have navigation capabilities that deliver as well as you do. According to Atlas Van Lines’ 2013 King of the Road survey, 61 percent of truck drivers already use GPS, so why not join the ranks?
  2. Smartphone: The King of the Road survey also reveals that 66 percent of truck drivers use smartphones. With countless apps for functional and entertainment purposes, a smartphone is the ultimate truck driving companion.
  3. Laptop computer: The larger screen and tactic keyboard of a laptop make it a mainstay for 43 percent of truck drivers, says the King of the Road survey. Whether you want to surf the web, watch a movie, or get in touch with loved ones, a laptop is certainly a worthy device.
  4. Onboard video camera: This tool is useful if you ever get into an accident and need to prove you were not at fault. It’s hard to argue with video evidence.
  5. Mobile reporting solution:  One of the best apps for on-the-go document submission is the TRANSFLO MOBILE SCANNING SOLUTION.  This solution from Pegasus TransTech provides a convenient, on-the-go scanning solution which allows drivers to scan and submit paperwork to carriers, and carriers to send paperwork to brokers.
  6. Qualcomm: Essential for fleets of any size, Qualcomm is a device that sends communications between the central office and the driver. It stores e-logs, tracks miles and offers navigation capabilities. Some devices also have Wi-Fi for on-the-go Internet access.
  7. MP3 player: Not every moment of your day is spent behind the wheel. Unwind before bed or boost your motivation during a workout by listening to music on your MP3 player.
  8. CB radio: This faithful device is the radio standard for professional drivers, an invaluable asset if you are stuck or blow a tire. The ability to instantly communicate with other drivers in your area could save you time and stress in an emergency.

To learn more about what today’s truck driver should keep in the cab, please visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then find us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn for more information.

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I Am Today’s Truck Driver

shutterstock 110348057 300x200 I Am Today’s Truck Driver

Today’s professional truck driver is very different from the image crafted by popular culture a few decades ago. Some truck driver stereotypes, both good and bad, date back to the 1940s. Things didn’t change much for drivers between World War II and the 1990s. However, since the turn of the century, truck drivers have been constructing a new image for themselves, one that makes 50-year old stereotypes sound very silly.

Today’s truck driver is:

Tech savvy: According to Atlas Van Lines’ 2013 King of the Road survey, 66 percent of truck drivers use smartphones. In addition, 61 percent use GPS and 43 percent keep a laptop with them on the road.

Concerned about living a healthy lifestyle: It’s tough to eat healthy and stay active as a truck driver, but the modern-day prominence of keeping drivers healthy is shattering the beer belly stereotype once associated with truck drivers.

A neatly-dressed skilled professional: Fleets treat drivers like the professionals they are, not because they’re better than everyone else, but because they’re held to the high standard that any upstanding company expects of its employees.

Safety-minded: Fleets and drivers today place a heavy emphasis on safety. Not only does this attitude save lives, but also it’s simply good for business. After all, manufacturers only want their freight handled by safe, responsible drivers.

Dedicated to doing a great job: Drivers are passionate about their chosen career. They put their whole soul into making deliveries on time and pleasing the customer.

Honest: The level of integrity shown by today’s truck drivers smashes the stereotypes formulated decades ago. Dishonest drivers do not last long in the industry.

Helpful to others: Things don’t always go right on the highway. That’s why the Truckload Carriers Association honors Highway Angels who perform good deeds to perfect strangers who need their help. Motorists who benefit from the aid of a truck driver who fixed a flat tire, pulled someone from a wrecked vehicle or administered CPR can nominate him or her for a Highway Angel recognition award. These incidents are more common than you might think.

A good provider: Truck drivers earn a great living, which helps them support themselves and their families.

The idea that truck drivers are societal outcasts is clearly disappearing. To learn more about the qualities that apply to today’s truck driver, please visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Find us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn for more information.

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