Benefits of Truck Driving Over the Road

If you’re thinking of a career in truck driving, you have a few important decisions to make. Will you be a company driver or owner-operator? Do you want to drive solo or as a team? truck-drivingWill you choose to be a local, regional or over-the-road truck driver?

As you do your research, be sure to take the benefits of OTR, or long-haul truck driving, into account. Just a few are:

  • Get paid to travel the country.
  • Earn more money the more miles you drive.
  • Enjoy unparalleled job security in an industry with severe worker shortages.
  • Have freedom to work on your own schedule instead of having a boss breathe down your neck.
  • Climb the pay scale quickly for maximum earnings in just a few years.

Once you decide truck driving over the road is right for you, you still need to decide which type of OTR career to choose. Here’s a look at three of your options.

General OTR

All over-the-road opportunities share some general characteristics. They require you to spend weeks at a time on the road. A typical schedule might be three weeks on the road with one week off to spend at home. Routes are paid by the mile and most drivers travel thousands of miles per week for great earning potential.

Coast-to-Coast Dedicated

Dedicated routes come in many forms, including a long haul coast-to-coast version. A career working a dedicated route means you transport goods between the same locations on a set schedule. It’s a desirable option if you enjoy predictability and want a personal relationship with the companies you transport goods for.

Expedited Truck Driving

You can expect to earn more per mile in this category because the cargo is expedited, meaning it needs to reach its destination fast. Expedited loads include perishable goods, flowers and delicacies such as live lobster.

Your schedule as an expedited driver could be quite erratic, with hours or even days between loads. Then, you’re expected to drop everything and take a job at a moment’s notice. The unpredictability may be worth it though, thanks to the extra mileage pay. You’ll likely be an owner-operator if you drive expedited routes, so you can take whichever loads you prefer.

For more information about over-the-road truck driving jobs, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for the latest trucking industry news.

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Hot Weather Truck Driving Tips

You may think of winter as the most challenging time to be a truck driver. Icy roads, poor visibility and blowing snow make for treacherous traveling conditions. But now that winter is just a memory, it’s time to consider the effects of hot weather on truck driving. To Extreme heat can be unhealthy and dangerous. Protect yourself and ensure you make deliveries safely with these hot weather truck driving tips.ensure you stay happy, healthy and safe on the road this summer, follow these tips.

Stay Hydrated

It’s important to drink plenty of liquid any time of year, but especially in the heat of summer. Water is best, but fruit juice, milk and tea are other great options for staying hydrated. Don’t overdo it on coffee, soda and energy drinks, since these can actually dehydrate you.

Lower Your Stress Level

Truck driving for a living can be stressful at times, especially when you’re hot and irritable. To help keep your stress levels down, plan your route ahead of time and have a plan B in case of storms or road construction. Avoid heavily trafficked areas at rush hour and keep your road rage in check. The last thing you need is to aggravate other irritated drivers with rude hand gestures.

Beat the Sun

Look into having your truck’s windows tinted. This filters out much of the light and makes your A/C more efficient. You might also want to slather on sunscreen since nothing’s worse than a painful sunburn while truck driving.

Keep Cool

The cab may be air conditioned, but you’ll be tempted to rush through fueling and making pre-trip inspections if you’re overheated. Keep a damp towel in your cooler and drape it around your neck when you spend time outside the cab. You’ll stay cool and comfortable until it’s time to retreat to the air-conditioned cab once again.

Give Extra Attention to Pre-Trip Inspections

You should always perform thorough checks before starting your route, but in extreme heat, it’s important to double check certain areas every time you hit the road, including:

  • Tire air pressure and mounting pressure
  • Condition of belts and hoses
  • Engine oil level
  • Gauges
  • Coolant level

By implementing these hot weather truck driving tips, you’ll enjoy spending this summer behind the wheel. For more information about truck driving jobs, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for the latest trucking industry news.

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Carrier of the Month | Arnold Transportation

Far too often in the transportation industry, drivers aren’t treated fairly. They’re forced to stay on the road away from their families for weeks at a time. They’re lumped into a group carrier-of-the-monthinstead of being treated as individuals.

Arnold Transportation, Jiggy Jobs’ ­carrier of the month, does things a little differently. Regional jobs get drivers home more often, and dispatchers know their drivers by name, not as a number. It’s this unmatched driver care and attention that remains the foundation of Arnold Transportation to this day.

Company History

Arnold Transportation has been driving regional since 1932. The company’s expertise lies in delivering dry van goods from the Northeast to the Southwest. The corporate office is located in Grand Prairie, Texas.

Driving Careers

Many career opportunities are available with this ­carrier of the month:

  • Company Drivers average 2,000 miles or more per week and haul industrial and consumer products. A new pay package allows company drivers to earn up to $0.48 per mile.
  • Owner-Operators are paired up with contractor-friendly freight, absolutely none of which comes from brokers. Fuel discounts and maintenance plans ensure you make a great profit for your business.
  • Recent CDL School Graduates can participate in Arnold Transportation’s Student Finishing Training Program to jumpstart their truck-driving career. Recent grads are paired with their own Driver Trainer to guide them every step of the way.
  • Driver Trainers play a vital role in helping new drivers begin a career as a professional truck driver. Trainers can expect great home time, access to late-model equipment and exceptional regional lanes.
  • Lease-Purchase Contractors have the opportunity to become owner-operators. The lease-purchase program benefits drivers with quality home time and $1 per mile, whether loaded or empty.

To learn more about this ­carrier of the month, or to apply for a driving career with Arnold Transportation, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more trucking industry news.

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Attracting Younger Drivers by Changing the Image of the Trucking Industry

Currently, the trucking industry is in an interesting position. According to Datamark Inc., the driver shortage at the end of 2014 was as high as 30,000 positions. If this trend trucking-industrycontinues, the driver shortage could reach over 100,000 by 2016.

Many factors have combined to create such a staggering shortage in the trucking industry. One is that strict federal safety regulations require drivers to take frequent breaks, meaning more drivers are needed to deliver the same goods as in the past. Another is that the economy and housing markets are improving, meaning more goods need to be transported.

The third reason for the shortage is that older drivers are retiring and leaving thousands of vacant positions in their wake. Younger drivers have a negative perception of the trucking industry, so they’re not filling these openings fast enough. Their image of a truck driver looks like something from Convoy or Smokey and the Bandit.

In order to break the current driver shortage trend, it’s imperative for carriers to transform the perceived image of truck driving from dirty jeans and cut off t-shirts to a professional career with the chance to make a good living. As you reach out to the younger generation, focus on the following points in your recruiting materials:

  • Truck drivers get to travel from coast to coast and see sites most people only dream of.
  • Unlike traditional office workers, truck drivers aren’t stuck in a boring cubicle. Their view changes every day, and work becomes an adventure.
  • Truck driving comes with competitive pay and good benefits.
  • Recruits don’t need a college degree to get started and work their way up to the top-earning bracket.
  • Because of the shortage, drivers get their pick of which carrier to work for.
  • Owner-operators have the chance to make their own schedule, take whatever routes they want and make an excellent living as a business owner.
  • Team driving is a great opportunity to stay on the go and earn higher wages with a spouse.
  • Cabs are filled with the latest advanced technology in the trucking industry to maintain open communication, monitor the engine and make life as a truck driver easier and more productive.

Attracting the younger generation doesn’t have to be difficult; you just need to know what benefits of being a truck driver appeal to them most. For more information about the trucking industry, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for the latest news.

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Truck Driving in West Virginia

It’s known as Wild, Wonderful West Virginia. Some even call it “Almost Heaven.” If your truck driving route takes you through the Mountain State, make the most of your time truck-drivingthere by visiting some of the top 10 tourist attractions.

Places to See While Truck Driving in West Virginia

  • Capitol Music Hall: If you love live musical performances, this attraction is certainly worth your time. Check the calendar and see who’s performing while you’re in the area.
  • Snowshoe Mountain: What would the Mountain State be without a ski resort? Voted one of the top 10 resorts in the East, Snowshoe Mountain offers snow tubing, pools and play zones as well as challenging terrain for experienced skiers.
  • The Town of Harpers Ferry: History buffs and thrill seekers alike love Harpers Ferry. Visit museums, take tours, go hiking or raft down the Potomac or Shenandoah Rivers.
  • Tamarack: Known as West Virginia’s Artisan Retail Center, Tamarack is the perfect place to shop for handmade souvenirs for your family back home.
  • New River Gorge Bridge: Traveling through West Virginia’s mountainous terrain is a challenge for those who live there, but the New River Gorge Bridge solves this problem as a beautiful work of art. A Bridge Walk Tour lets you enjoy breathtaking views at the most photographed site in the state.
  • Monongahela National Forest: If you’re a nature lover, you can’t miss out on the chance to hike or drive through this scenic 900,000-acre forest.
  • Summersville Lake: This unique vacation destination is home to the only working lighthouse in West Virginia. You’ll certainly want to take a tour during your visit.
  • South Charleston Memorial Ice Arena: This spectacular venue for hockey games is a site you must visit if you love the sport. Cheer on your favorite team or take to the ice yourself for a unique exercising opportunity during your time off.
  • Stonewall Jackson Lake: Looking for a place to unwind between truck driving routes? This four-diamond rated resort is the perfect place to try out the 18-hole golf course, go swimming or take a winery tour.
  • Blackwater Falls State Park: As one of the most famous tourist attractions in West Virginia, this state park gives you the chance to go hiking, boating and fishing as well explore the museum and historical center.

Truck Driving Resources for Traveling through West Virginia

Visit www.truckstopsonline.com and search for truck stops in West Virginia so you know where to stop for all the amenities you need along your route. Then, remain up-to-date with current road conditions and travel alerts by checking the West Virginia Department of Transportation website often.

To learn more about truck driving in West Virginia, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more trucking industry news.

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Spring Means Truck Driving Through Road Construction Zones

You’re probably excited to put winter truck driving conditions behind you, at least for the next several months. However, with warmer temperatures comes more roadwork. Orangetruck-driving construction cones pop up like daisies all over the nation’s interstates. The need to repair potholes, widen roads, repave areas and make other improvements is dire now that spring is here.

While the Federal Highway Administration reports work zone fatalities have dropped nearly every year since 2005, even one death is one too many. Follow certain safety tips while truck driving through construction zones to make it safer for everyone:

  • Follow the directions on roadway signs. Temporary signage is usually set up as you approach work zones. You might be alerted of closed lanes ahead, reduced speed or closed shoulders. Heed these signs. Continue driving at the posted work zone speed limit until you see a sign specifically stating you have left the zone.
  • Remain on the lookout for aggressive drivers. They may attempt to pass you before you enter the work zone and might not use their turn signal when changing lanes. Slowing down to let them through could prevent an accident.
  • Proceed with caution. Cones and barriers are meant to guide the flow of traffic, but they provide little protection for workers. Keep an eye out for personnel near the roadway and steer clear of them.
  • Leave extra room. Construction zones are full of unpredictable debris and hazards that could require drivers to slam on their brakes. To prevent a rear-end collision, never follow the car ahead of you too closely.
  • Keep your cool. As you enter a work zone, realize that delays are inevitable. Stay calm and don’t rush. Remain aware of your surroundings and put distractions away.
  • Take alternate routes if possible. Before you even hit the pavement, plan your route to avoid truck driving through work zones whenever possible. A little pre-planning helps you avoid the stress, hazards and delays associated with road construction.

To learn more truck driving safety tips, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more trucking industry news.

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Safe Truck Driving Habits

Unsafe truck driving leads to accidents and road rage incidents. To make the best of your truck-drivingtime on the road and to keep yourself and others safe, see if your truck driving habits match these tips to make sure you’re doing your part to promote safety on the road.

  • Stay rested and take scheduled breaks: A profound part of safe truck driving comes from taking plenty of breaks. According to an American Family Insurance article, staying awake for 18 hours is equivalent to having a blood alcohol level of .08 percent, which is considered legally drunk! Hours of Service regulations also establish driving limits and required rest breaks to ensure truck drivers aren’t overworking themselves to earn more. Schedule regular breaks to remain in compliance.
  • Eat healthy: A healthy body facilitates a more focused mind, which is imperative for alert truck driving. Strive to get enough fruits and vegetables in your diet and avoid fatty, deep-fried foods from truck stops and fast food restaurants.
  • Limit distractions: The deadliest truck driving distractions include drowsiness, operating or talking on a cell phone, reading a map, eating or drinking, applying makeup and adjusting the radio. To limit your distractions, put everything away. Then, keep your eyes on the road and both hands on the wheel.
  • Keep a safe distance: Maintain several car lengths between you and the car or truck ahead of you so you have time to stop if they slam on their brakes.
  • Remain aware of blind spots: Your truck’s “no-zones” include directly behind it and next to it on either side. You hope other drivers know to stay out of the no-zones, but check your mirrors every five to eight seconds, as well as before changing lanes, to watch for cars entering and exiting these blind spots.
  • Drive defensively: Being a defensive driver means you hold your own on the road and allow aggressive, dangerous drivers to pass. Never challenge impatient drivers, and stay out of the passing lane to prevent road rage incidents.
  • Back up safely: Follow the Get Out And Look (GOAL) rule anytime you need to put your truck in reverse.
  • Enter and exit the interstate safely: Accelerate on the entrance ramp to match your speed with the flow of traffic. Don’t stop in the acceleration lane to wait for a gap. Watch road signs carefully so you know when your exit is approaching. Get into the right lane in plenty of time. Only start decelerating once you’re on the exit ramp.
  • Drive and park safely at truck stops: Remain defensive until you find a place to park. Pedestrians, including children and pets, could dart around the lot, so watch carefully. Park in a well-lit area to deter thieves.

To learn more truck driving safety tips, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more trucking industry news.

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Carrier of the Month | K&B Transportation

Every month, Jiggy Jobs highlights one of the best carriers in the industry so you can become familiar with what top companies offer their drivers. The ­carrier of the month for carrier-of-the-monthMarch is K&B Transportation. Could this be the right company for you? Here’s some more info about K&B that could help you find out:

History

A truck driver started K&B Transportation in 1986 as a temperature-controlled transport company. This carrier of the month has stuck to its business model through the years and to this day, it’s the largest 100 percent company driver, refrigerated carrier in the country.

The company headquarters are in South Sioux City, Nebraska, giving the company easy access to routes from Colorado to Ohio and Minnesota to Texas. K&B Transportation also serves customers in the Pacific Northwest and as far southeast as Georgia. The company has established a reputation for unmatched customer service and on-time pickups and deliveries.

Services

K&B Transportation is a leader in on-time refrigerated product delivery. This ­carrier of the month can make such a claim because:

  • Drivers are available for dispatch 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
  • Late-model tractors and trailers are kept in pristine condition.
  • On-site backup generators continue to power the office in case of power failure.
  • Redundant data backups ensure client information is never lost.
  • Employees in all areas of the company are stable and dedicated.

Drive for K&B

K&B Transportation only hires company drivers. Routes include local, dedicated, regional and long haul. Benefits for K&B drivers include the following:

  • Pay is salaried or based on guaranteed mileage (2,500 miles per week).
  • Pay starts at 45 cents per mile (with one year of prior over-the-road experience).
  • Medical, dental and life insurance coverage is offered for all full-time drivers and their dependents.
  • Accessory pay ensures you’re making money, even if your wheels aren’t turning.
  • Paid vacation.

To learn more about this ­carrier of the month, or to apply for a driving career with K&B Transportation, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more trucking industry news.

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Truck Driving in Tennessee

As a truck driver, your career likely takes you through many states, including Tennessee. As you already know, truck driving provides a unique chance to sightsee during your time truck-drivingoff. The next time you have a day to spare in the Volunteer State, you should make time to tour some of the area’s most iconic sites.

Places to See While Truck Driving in Tennessee

  • Graceland Mansion: The home of Elvis Presley is open to the public with many exhibits for visitors to enjoy. The 14-acre estate has something for everyone, die-hard Elvis fans or not.
  • Ryman Auditorium: This historic auditorium constructed in 1892 is the place to see concerts, comedy shows, sing-offs and more. Buy tickets in advance for your favorite show when you know you’ll be in town.
  • Reelfoot Lake: If you love fishing, boating or just seeing wildlife up close, you’ll love the flooded forest area of Reelfoot Lake, located in northwest Tennessee.
  • Jack Daniels Distillery: Daily tours in this Lynchburg, Tennessee distillery unveil the complete story behind Jack Daniels’ whiskey.
  • Beale Street Memphis: Beale Street’s biggest claim to fame is that blues and rock and roll were born here. Big events take place here year round, but even if your time is limited, just soak up the atmosphere and grab a bite to eat at one of the street’s iconic restaurants.
  • Country Music Hall of Fame: Country music fans can’t miss a visit to the Hall of Fame. Learn all about Alan Jackson, Kenny Rogers, Ronnie Milsap and other favorites at exhibits throughout the venue.
  • Smoky Mountain National Park: The Smoky Mountains boast wondrous wildlife diversity for you to explore on your visit to this renowned national park.
  • The Hermitage: Home of the People’s President, Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage is a great place to soak up a little US history. The newest exhibit, Andrew Jackson: Born for a Storm, brings the president’s rich story to life.
  • Lookout Mountain: Located minutes away from Chattanooga, Tennessee, Lookout Mountain offers adventurous activities to enjoy between truck driving routes. Ruby Falls, Rock City and Incline Railway are three great attractions to check out.
  • Gaylord Opryland Hotel: Even with a sleeper at your disposal, it’s worth staying a night at this iconic hotel in Nashville, Tennessee. The signature glass atriums create the perfect setting for dining, shopping and recreation all under one roof.

Truck Driving Resources for Traveling through Tennessee

Check out which truck stops have the amenities you need as you travel through Tennessee. Then, stay up-to-date with the state’s latest travel alerts and road conditions by visiting the Tennessee Department of Transportation website.

To learn more about truck driving through Tennessee, please visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Be sure to find us on FacebookTwitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more information about the trucking industry.

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Team Truck Driving | Perfect For Empty Nesters

Have all your children grown up and moved out? If so, you’re entering a stage of life you probably thought would never come, but there’s no denying it now: you’re an empty truck-drivingnester.

You and your spouse now have some big decisions to make. Will you continue with life as usual? Will you spend all your retirement savings traveling the world? Or will you enter the truck driving industry and use this time to build assets before you officially retire?

Maybe you never thought of it before, but truck driving provides one of the best opportunities for empty nesters to make good money while soaking in the sites around the country. Rest assured, you can get in all the traveling you ever wanted while still building a nest egg for retirement.

A typical week for empty nester team truck drivers might include driving from California to New Jersey then to Texas and back to California, using layover periods to visit world-renowned restaurants in Chicago, ride a ferry down the Mississippi River and take scenic pictures at the Grand Canyon.

Over-the-road truck driving offers the retired lifestyle every empty nester wants with the added benefit of getting paid good money! Team drivers often rake in $60,000 to $90,000 or more after just a few years of experience. Even if you make this much now, does your job let you travel the country and sightsee with your spouse by your side?

Getting started is easy. In an industry where driver shortage is a serious problem for many carriers, your intent to begin team driving with your spouse makes you an in-demand employee. All you need to do is earn your commercial driver’s license (CDL), and you’ll be all set to apply for an entry-level team driving position. Many driving schools seamlessly transition you from the classroom to behind-the-wheel training to a good-paying job in just a few weeks.

If you’re still questioning whether truck driving is the right choice for you and your spouse, consider the reasons empty nesters make the perfect team drivers:

  • Your life experiences make you a perfect candidate, even if you have no prior professional driving experience.
  • You and your spouse have already proven you make a great team.
  • You have nothing tying you down at home.
  • If your kids and their families live hundreds of miles away, truck driving gives you an excuse to drop in and visit the grandkids.
  • Traveling as a couple is a fun, rewarding and lucrative way to continue saving for retirement.

To learn more about over-the-road team truck driving opportunities in your area, please visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then find us on FacebookTwitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more information about what being a truck driver is like.

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