Truck Driving in West Virginia

It’s known as Wild, Wonderful West Virginia. Some even call it “Almost Heaven.” If your truck driving route takes you through the Mountain State, make the most of your time truck-drivingthere by visiting some of the top 10 tourist attractions.

Places to See While Truck Driving in West Virginia

  • Capitol Music Hall: If you love live musical performances, this attraction is certainly worth your time. Check the calendar and see who’s performing while you’re in the area.
  • Snowshoe Mountain: What would the Mountain State be without a ski resort? Voted one of the top 10 resorts in the East, Snowshoe Mountain offers snow tubing, pools and play zones as well as challenging terrain for experienced skiers.
  • The Town of Harpers Ferry: History buffs and thrill seekers alike love Harpers Ferry. Visit museums, take tours, go hiking or raft down the Potomac or Shenandoah Rivers.
  • Tamarack: Known as West Virginia’s Artisan Retail Center, Tamarack is the perfect place to shop for handmade souvenirs for your family back home.
  • New River Gorge Bridge: Traveling through West Virginia’s mountainous terrain is a challenge for those who live there, but the New River Gorge Bridge solves this problem as a beautiful work of art. A Bridge Walk Tour lets you enjoy breathtaking views at the most photographed site in the state.
  • Monongahela National Forest: If you’re a nature lover, you can’t miss out on the chance to hike or drive through this scenic 900,000-acre forest.
  • Summersville Lake: This unique vacation destination is home to the only working lighthouse in West Virginia. You’ll certainly want to take a tour during your visit.
  • South Charleston Memorial Ice Arena: This spectacular venue for hockey games is a site you must visit if you love the sport. Cheer on your favorite team or take to the ice yourself for a unique exercising opportunity during your time off.
  • Stonewall Jackson Lake: Looking for a place to unwind between truck driving routes? This four-diamond rated resort is the perfect place to try out the 18-hole golf course, go swimming or take a winery tour.
  • Blackwater Falls State Park: As one of the most famous tourist attractions in West Virginia, this state park gives you the chance to go hiking, boating and fishing as well explore the museum and historical center.

Truck Driving Resources for Traveling through West Virginia

Visit www.truckstopsonline.com and search for truck stops in West Virginia so you know where to stop for all the amenities you need along your route. Then, remain up-to-date with current road conditions and travel alerts by checking the West Virginia Department of Transportation website often.

To learn more about truck driving in West Virginia, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more trucking industry news.

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Spring Means Truck Driving Through Road Construction Zones

You’re probably excited to put winter truck driving conditions behind you, at least for the next several months. However, with warmer temperatures comes more roadwork. Orangetruck-driving construction cones pop up like daisies all over the nation’s interstates. The need to repair potholes, widen roads, repave areas and make other improvements is dire now that spring is here.

While the Federal Highway Administration reports work zone fatalities have dropped nearly every year since 2005, even one death is one too many. Follow certain safety tips while truck driving through construction zones to make it safer for everyone:

  • Follow the directions on roadway signs. Temporary signage is usually set up as you approach work zones. You might be alerted of closed lanes ahead, reduced speed or closed shoulders. Heed these signs. Continue driving at the posted work zone speed limit until you see a sign specifically stating you have left the zone.
  • Remain on the lookout for aggressive drivers. They may attempt to pass you before you enter the work zone and might not use their turn signal when changing lanes. Slowing down to let them through could prevent an accident.
  • Proceed with caution. Cones and barriers are meant to guide the flow of traffic, but they provide little protection for workers. Keep an eye out for personnel near the roadway and steer clear of them.
  • Leave extra room. Construction zones are full of unpredictable debris and hazards that could require drivers to slam on their brakes. To prevent a rear-end collision, never follow the car ahead of you too closely.
  • Keep your cool. As you enter a work zone, realize that delays are inevitable. Stay calm and don’t rush. Remain aware of your surroundings and put distractions away.
  • Take alternate routes if possible. Before you even hit the pavement, plan your route to avoid truck driving through work zones whenever possible. A little pre-planning helps you avoid the stress, hazards and delays associated with road construction.

To learn more truck driving safety tips, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more trucking industry news.

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Safe Truck Driving Habits

Unsafe truck driving leads to accidents and road rage incidents. To make the best of your truck-drivingtime on the road and to keep yourself and others safe, see if your truck driving habits match these tips to make sure you’re doing your part to promote safety on the road.

  • Stay rested and take scheduled breaks: A profound part of safe truck driving comes from taking plenty of breaks. According to an American Family Insurance article, staying awake for 18 hours is equivalent to having a blood alcohol level of .08 percent, which is considered legally drunk! Hours of Service regulations also establish driving limits and required rest breaks to ensure truck drivers aren’t overworking themselves to earn more. Schedule regular breaks to remain in compliance.
  • Eat healthy: A healthy body facilitates a more focused mind, which is imperative for alert truck driving. Strive to get enough fruits and vegetables in your diet and avoid fatty, deep-fried foods from truck stops and fast food restaurants.
  • Limit distractions: The deadliest truck driving distractions include drowsiness, operating or talking on a cell phone, reading a map, eating or drinking, applying makeup and adjusting the radio. To limit your distractions, put everything away. Then, keep your eyes on the road and both hands on the wheel.
  • Keep a safe distance: Maintain several car lengths between you and the car or truck ahead of you so you have time to stop if they slam on their brakes.
  • Remain aware of blind spots: Your truck’s “no-zones” include directly behind it and next to it on either side. You hope other drivers know to stay out of the no-zones, but check your mirrors every five to eight seconds, as well as before changing lanes, to watch for cars entering and exiting these blind spots.
  • Drive defensively: Being a defensive driver means you hold your own on the road and allow aggressive, dangerous drivers to pass. Never challenge impatient drivers, and stay out of the passing lane to prevent road rage incidents.
  • Back up safely: Follow the Get Out And Look (GOAL) rule anytime you need to put your truck in reverse.
  • Enter and exit the interstate safely: Accelerate on the entrance ramp to match your speed with the flow of traffic. Don’t stop in the acceleration lane to wait for a gap. Watch road signs carefully so you know when your exit is approaching. Get into the right lane in plenty of time. Only start decelerating once you’re on the exit ramp.
  • Drive and park safely at truck stops: Remain defensive until you find a place to park. Pedestrians, including children and pets, could dart around the lot, so watch carefully. Park in a well-lit area to deter thieves.

To learn more truck driving safety tips, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more trucking industry news.

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Carrier of the Month | K&B Transportation

Every month, Jiggy Jobs highlights one of the best carriers in the industry so you can become familiar with what top companies offer their drivers. The ­carrier of the month for carrier-of-the-monthMarch is K&B Transportation. Could this be the right company for you? Here’s some more info about K&B that could help you find out:

History

A truck driver started K&B Transportation in 1986 as a temperature-controlled transport company. This carrier of the month has stuck to its business model through the years and to this day, it’s the largest 100 percent company driver, refrigerated carrier in the country.

The company headquarters are in South Sioux City, Nebraska, giving the company easy access to routes from Colorado to Ohio and Minnesota to Texas. K&B Transportation also serves customers in the Pacific Northwest and as far southeast as Georgia. The company has established a reputation for unmatched customer service and on-time pickups and deliveries.

Services

K&B Transportation is a leader in on-time refrigerated product delivery. This ­carrier of the month can make such a claim because:

  • Drivers are available for dispatch 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
  • Late-model tractors and trailers are kept in pristine condition.
  • On-site backup generators continue to power the office in case of power failure.
  • Redundant data backups ensure client information is never lost.
  • Employees in all areas of the company are stable and dedicated.

Drive for K&B

K&B Transportation only hires company drivers. Routes include local, dedicated, regional and long haul. Benefits for K&B drivers include the following:

  • Pay is salaried or based on guaranteed mileage (2,500 miles per week).
  • Pay starts at 45 cents per mile (with one year of prior over-the-road experience).
  • Medical, dental and life insurance coverage is offered for all full-time drivers and their dependents.
  • Accessory pay ensures you’re making money, even if your wheels aren’t turning.
  • Paid vacation.

To learn more about this ­carrier of the month, or to apply for a driving career with K&B Transportation, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more trucking industry news.

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Truck Driving in Tennessee

As a truck driver, your career likely takes you through many states, including Tennessee. As you already know, truck driving provides a unique chance to sightsee during your time truck-drivingoff. The next time you have a day to spare in the Volunteer State, you should make time to tour some of the area’s most iconic sites.

Places to See While Truck Driving in Tennessee

  • Graceland Mansion: The home of Elvis Presley is open to the public with many exhibits for visitors to enjoy. The 14-acre estate has something for everyone, die-hard Elvis fans or not.
  • Ryman Auditorium: This historic auditorium constructed in 1892 is the place to see concerts, comedy shows, sing-offs and more. Buy tickets in advance for your favorite show when you know you’ll be in town.
  • Reelfoot Lake: If you love fishing, boating or just seeing wildlife up close, you’ll love the flooded forest area of Reelfoot Lake, located in northwest Tennessee.
  • Jack Daniels Distillery: Daily tours in this Lynchburg, Tennessee distillery unveil the complete story behind Jack Daniels’ whiskey.
  • Beale Street Memphis: Beale Street’s biggest claim to fame is that blues and rock and roll were born here. Big events take place here year round, but even if your time is limited, just soak up the atmosphere and grab a bite to eat at one of the street’s iconic restaurants.
  • Country Music Hall of Fame: Country music fans can’t miss a visit to the Hall of Fame. Learn all about Alan Jackson, Kenny Rogers, Ronnie Milsap and other favorites at exhibits throughout the venue.
  • Smoky Mountain National Park: The Smoky Mountains boast wondrous wildlife diversity for you to explore on your visit to this renowned national park.
  • The Hermitage: Home of the People’s President, Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage is a great place to soak up a little US history. The newest exhibit, Andrew Jackson: Born for a Storm, brings the president’s rich story to life.
  • Lookout Mountain: Located minutes away from Chattanooga, Tennessee, Lookout Mountain offers adventurous activities to enjoy between truck driving routes. Ruby Falls, Rock City and Incline Railway are three great attractions to check out.
  • Gaylord Opryland Hotel: Even with a sleeper at your disposal, it’s worth staying a night at this iconic hotel in Nashville, Tennessee. The signature glass atriums create the perfect setting for dining, shopping and recreation all under one roof.

Truck Driving Resources for Traveling through Tennessee

Check out which truck stops have the amenities you need as you travel through Tennessee. Then, stay up-to-date with the state’s latest travel alerts and road conditions by visiting the Tennessee Department of Transportation website.

To learn more about truck driving through Tennessee, please visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Be sure to find us on FacebookTwitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more information about the trucking industry.

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Team Truck Driving | Perfect For Empty Nesters

Have all your children grown up and moved out? If so, you’re entering a stage of life you probably thought would never come, but there’s no denying it now: you’re an empty truck-drivingnester.

You and your spouse now have some big decisions to make. Will you continue with life as usual? Will you spend all your retirement savings traveling the world? Or will you enter the truck driving industry and use this time to build assets before you officially retire?

Maybe you never thought of it before, but truck driving provides one of the best opportunities for empty nesters to make good money while soaking in the sites around the country. Rest assured, you can get in all the traveling you ever wanted while still building a nest egg for retirement.

A typical week for empty nester team truck drivers might include driving from California to New Jersey then to Texas and back to California, using layover periods to visit world-renowned restaurants in Chicago, ride a ferry down the Mississippi River and take scenic pictures at the Grand Canyon.

Over-the-road truck driving offers the retired lifestyle every empty nester wants with the added benefit of getting paid good money! Team drivers often rake in $60,000 to $90,000 or more after just a few years of experience. Even if you make this much now, does your job let you travel the country and sightsee with your spouse by your side?

Getting started is easy. In an industry where driver shortage is a serious problem for many carriers, your intent to begin team driving with your spouse makes you an in-demand employee. All you need to do is earn your commercial driver’s license (CDL), and you’ll be all set to apply for an entry-level team driving position. Many driving schools seamlessly transition you from the classroom to behind-the-wheel training to a good-paying job in just a few weeks.

If you’re still questioning whether truck driving is the right choice for you and your spouse, consider the reasons empty nesters make the perfect team drivers:

  • Your life experiences make you a perfect candidate, even if you have no prior professional driving experience.
  • You and your spouse have already proven you make a great team.
  • You have nothing tying you down at home.
  • If your kids and their families live hundreds of miles away, truck driving gives you an excuse to drop in and visit the grandkids.
  • Traveling as a couple is a fun, rewarding and lucrative way to continue saving for retirement.

To learn more about over-the-road team truck driving opportunities in your area, please visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then find us on FacebookTwitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more information about what being a truck driver is like.

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Tax Time is Coming | Deductions for Truck Drivers

If you have yet to file your taxes, make sure you first understand all the deductions truck-driversavailable for truck drivers. Claiming everything you’re entitled to lowers your tax liability and helps you recoup some of the expenses associated with traveling for a living. Both company truck drivers and owner-operators have a number of deductions available to them. Use these tips to maximize your deductions and get through an audit unscathed.

Keep Your Receipts for Itemized Deductions

An itemized deduction involves adding up your specific truck driving costs throughout the year. Itemizing is more tedious than taking a standard deduction, but you should opt for whichever type gives you the biggest tax break.

Without proof of purchase, you miss out on many potential deductions. If you plan to itemize, keep a pocket organizer with all your receipts regarding everything you purchased for use in your truck the previous year. You can deduct items in the following categories:

  • Daily meal allowances ($36 per day on the road for a standard deduction if you don’t want to add up every meal receipt)
  • Mileage
  • Truck maintenance costs
  • Overnight hotel expenses
  • Union dues
  • Truck cleaning supplies
  • Office supplies
  • Electronics for the cab (GPS, CB radio, cell phone)
  • Load expenses (bungee cords, locks, wide load flags)
  • Tools (flashlights, tire iron, wrenches, duct tape)
  • Protective clothing (boots, hard hat, gloves, safety goggles)
  • Fees (tolls, ATM fees, DOT physical, parking fees, Hazmat clearance)

The IRS knows some expenses don’t come with a receipt, so they accept handwritten receipts as long as they are not excessive. Examples include laundry costs, truck washes and pay phone calls for business purposes.

Log Your Hours

Diligently update your logbook each day with your hours and mileage. This proves to the taxman how many days you were on the road, which is an important part of claiming tax deductions.

Understand Restrictions

In order to claim travel expenses, truck drivers must have a place to live while not on the road. This is known as a tax home; a PO Box doesn’t count. If you live in your truck, you can’t claim any travel expenses.

Consult a Tax Professional

Because it’s easy to overlook many of the deductions available for truck drivers, and every person’s situation is different, it’s recommended that you hire a tax professional who is familiar with the trucking industry’s special tax rules to help you get the biggest return possible.

To learn more about tax breaks for truck drivers, please visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then find us on FacebookTwitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more information about the trucking industry.

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Jiggy Jobs at the Mid America Trucking Show

As the largest annual heavy-duty trucking industry event in the world, the Mid America Trucking Show has plenty for you to do and see. MATS is March 26-28 at the Kentucky mid-america-trucking-showExpo Center in Louisville, Kentucky.

If you’re attending the Mid America Trucking Show this year, be sure to stop by the Jiggy Jobs booth. You can find us at Booth #69004 in the Recruiting Hall. We’re here to help in your search for a trucking job. Plus, we hand out free donuts and cookies to visitors just for checking us out.

Big Events at the Mid America Trucking Show

One of the most notable events at MATS every year is the PKY Truck Beauty Championship. This is the largest gathering of decked out trucks in the nation, and everyone vies for honors in the beauty contest. Stop by Lot J behind the West Wing for a look. Trucks are on display all three days.

The MATS Concert is the evening of March 27 and will feature The Marshall Tucker Band, rocking Freedom Hall with jazz, country, rock, gospel and blues music. All attendees have access to the concert for free. Just make sure you pick up your tickets from the event’s sponsor, Mobil Delvac, the morning of March 26 or 27 at booth #18160 or #90400.

The event also has informative seminars. These trucking-oriented sessions provide invaluable information for fleet owners, companies and truck drivers. All seminars are located in South Wing Conference Center, Room B-104. Entrance is included with your Mid America Trucking Show ticket and no advanced registration is required.

Other Things to do Around Louisville

You’ve made the trip all the way out to Louisville, Kentucky; why not enjoy the sites a little longer before you head back home? A great site to see is the Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory. This museum is a must see if you’re a baseball fan!

Fourth Street Live!, located between Muhammad Ali Boulevard and Liberty Street in downtown Louisville, is the right place to be if you want to dine, shop and enjoy live entertainment.

If you want a tour of the Ohio River while you’re in town, hop aboard the Belle of Louisville. This steamboat is the oldest operating vessel of its kind anywhere in the world.

The Frazier History Museum is a great place to visit if you love history. Exhibits here take you back as far as 1,000 years to people and events that changed the course of the world.

If you’re planning to attend the Mid America Trucking Show this year, we’re excited to see you there! Remember to stop by the Jiggy Jobs booth during the event. To learn more about us, please visit our website. We post new trucking jobs daily. Then, find us on Twitter, LinkedInFacebook and YouTube for even more information.

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CPAP – Helping Truck Drivers with Sleep Apnea to Get Rested and Refreshed

Does your partner claim you snore loudly? Do you wake up gasping in the middle of the truck-drivernight? Are you exhausted every day, no matter how much sleep you got the night before? If you answered yes to any of these, you could be a truck driver with sleep apnea.

The primary risk factors for sleep apnea are similar to the demographics that make up the brunt of the commercial driver population: male, overweight and over age 40. According to the Protecting Professional Drivers (PPD) website, up to 28 percent of truck drivers have sleep apnea. Fortunately, the condition is diagnosable and treatable.

Sleep apnea develops when breathing is interrupted during sleep. The most common type, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), occurs when tissues in the throat collapse, producing loud snoring and a completely blocked airway. Those with the condition can attest to how exhausting it is to have their sleep cycle interrupted as frequently as every 30 seconds all night long.

PPD offers an effective treatment option for patients with OSA called Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, or CPAP. This is when you wear a mask over your nose that gently blows heated, humidified air into the throat while you sleep. The airflow is set to your individual needs and acts as a “splint” to keep the airway open.

A growing number of truck drivers are volunteering for the screening process and CPAP treatment. Here’s a look at one truck driver’s life-changing experience overcoming sleep apnea with CPAP:

“I was always exhausted throughout the day. I nodded off all the time and would even doze off in the middle of a conversation. Not only was it embarrassing, it was dangerous. I finally agreed to a sleep study after talking with a doctor. The sleep study confirmed I had severe sleep apnea. The test showed I never achieved REM sleep during a four-hour period. I stopped breathing an average of nine times an hour, and I tossed and turned throughout the sleep study. I was amazed when I saw the video of me sleeping.

“I was fitted for a CPAP machine. Yes, it did take a couple nights to get used to it, but it has been a life changer. I sleep straight through the night and wake up refreshed. My wife is glad because I don’t snore or gasp when I sleep. I use what is called a nasal pillow, which is very small and does not smother me. I don’t even take a nap without my CPAP on.”

If you are interested in participating in a sleep study to learn whether you have sleep apnea, visit the PPD website for more information. Then, learn about opportunities for truck drivers by visiting the Jiggy Jobs website and finding us on TwitterLinkedIn, Facebook and YouTube.

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How Have Lower Fuel Prices Impacted the Trucking Industry?

From pizza delivery to public transit, everyone is breathing a sigh of relief as gas prices approach a national average of $2.00 per gallon. Diesel fuel, a staple in ttrucking-industryhe trucking industry, also saw a substantial price drop of $0.44 per gallon in December, according to the Auburn Citizen, and is expected to see another $0.35 to $0.50 drop by the end of January.

Trucks, trains and ships relying on diesel have been greatly impacted by dropping fuel prices. Here’s how:

Higher Earning Power for Trucking Companies

According to the Salt Lake Tribune, the American Trucking Association estimates that for every 1-cent drop in diesel costs, the trucking industry as a whole saves $350 million per year. A 70-cent drop in the past 12 months resulted in a whopping $24 billion in savings, and while 85 percent of the savings goes to shippers, trucking companies have the opportunity to boost their bottom line as well.

Better Pricing for Customers

When costs are down for transportation providers in the trucking industry, they can pass the savings on to customers. In 2008 when national fuel prices averaged $4.76 per gallon, many transportation companies charged a fuel surcharge to their customers. Lower prices mean the surcharge is decreased or completely eliminated.

Greater Optimism Among Truck Drivers

Increased savings at the pump increases morale among truck drivers and boosts spirits. More freight becomes available when companies offer lower prices, which in turn gives drivers more miles and increases their income.

Less Interest in Alternative Fuels

This negative impact comes as no surprise in an industry where the bottom line must be a top priority. Cleaner vehicles powered by biodiesel, natural gas and electricity are in lower demand as diesel fuel and gasoline prices continue to drop. Shippers are delaying purchases of natural gas-powered trucks, waiting to see if gas prices continue to fluctuate. While natural gas is still cheaper than diesel fuel – at least for now – the slim price differential means it takes longer to recoup the $50,000 additional investment Reuters says it takes to purchase a natural gas truck.

The forecast made by GasBuddy, a fuel pricing and forecasting website, calls for prices to remain mostly steady throughout 2015. While this means transportation companies might not get to enjoy another dollar drop like we saw in 2014, it means the savings in the trucking industry and beyond could continue. Keep on top of AAA national gas price averages by visiting fuelgaugereport.com.

If you’re interested in starting a career in the trucking industry, please visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, learn about other trucking industry topics by finding us on TwitterLinkedIn, Facebook and YouTube.

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