Speed Limiters | Good or Bad for Truck Drivers

The American Trucking Associations (ATA) is currently seeking speed limiters for heavy-duty truck. The organization petitioned the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Speed limiters are a hot topic among truck drivers. Are they just what the transportation industry needs, or could they carry unintended safety consequences?Administration (FMCSA) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to program electronic speed limiters to 65 miles per hour for all large trucks back in 2006. The government finally said it would move ahead with the legislation in 2011, but for the past four years the regulation has been mired in bureaucracy.

ATA is in favor of speed limiters, while most small business truck drivers are against it. Consider the arguments from both sides and decide where you stand:

Why Speed Limiters are Good for Truck Drivers

  • Federal data identifies driving too fast for the conditions or above the posted speed limit as the reason behind 18 percent of fatal crashes caused by heavy-duty trucks. Mandated speed limiters could reduce accidents, injuries, fatalities and property destruction on roads with posted speed limits of 55 mph and above.
  • ATA backs a national speed limit for all vehicles to 65 mph and is disturbed by the recent trend of raising speed limits to 75, 80 or even 85 mph.

Why Speed Limiters are Bad for Truck Drivers

  • Forcing truck drivers to travel slower than the flow of traffic could have unintended safety consequences.
  • Vehicles traveling at different speeds on the highway foster a less safe, unpredictable driving environment.
  • Speed limiters could increase cases of road rage and congestion.
  • Speed limiters are just another way to hamper small business truck drivers from making efficient deliveries.
  • Instead of imposing speed restrictions on trucks, opponents of the rule say adequate training and rewards for voluntary governing could be a superior alternative.

Once the proposed ruled is published sometime later this summer, it will be open for public comment for 60 days. Following the public comment period, a final rule will be published and likely go into effect two years later.

After considering the pros and cons, what do you think? Are speed limiters good or bad for truck drivers? Let us know where you stand in the debate.

For more information about speed limiters and other issues truck drivers face, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for the latest trucking industry news.

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Truck Driving in Georgia

Nicknamed The Peach State, Georgia is a popular place to drive through while transporting goods across the southeastern U.S. If you find yourself stopped in Georgia Where will your truck driving career take you next? If Georgia is on your route, make time to visit some of the state’s most beloved attractions.between truck driving deliveries, fill your downtime with some of the state’s top attractions.

Places to See While Truck Driving in Georgia

  1. Stone Mountain Park: As the most popular attraction in the state, this park offers a variety of activities from hikes, to train rides, to live entertainment.
  2. Callaway Gardens: As you might expect from its name, Callaway Gardens is a great place for nature lovers. There are plenty of adventurous activities to keep you occupied as well, including zip lines, water sports and geocaching.
  3. Georgia Aquarium: If you love underwater creatures, you shouldn’t pass up the chance to visit the world’s largest aquarium. There, you’ll have a chance to spot more than 500 different species of fish, shark, whale and more.
  4. Meinhardt Vineyards & Winery: Stop by this beautiful attraction in Savannah for free wine tastings and tours.
  5. Museum of Aviation: Air Force veterans and aircraft fans alike can come here to enjoy historical exhibits from America’s past wars.
  6. Jimmy Carter National Historic Site: This museum and visitor center highlights the life and political policies of the nation’s 39th
  7. Okefenokee Swamp: The “Land of Trembling Earth” is a precious natural area located in southeastern Georgia. The more than 700-square-mile wildlife refuge is home to 10,000 alligators and features motor boat water trails and camping areas.
  8. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Site: Celebrate the life of this civil rights movement leader. Visit his Atlanta home, hear his story and marvel at his strength as he pushed for unprecedented social change 50 years ago.
  9. World of Coca-Cola: Explore where they make the world’s most famous brand of soda. Tour the factory, interact with displays and shop for a souvenir to take home.
  10. Centennial Olympic Park: Originally constructed for the Olympics in 1996, the park remains a popular place for tourists to eat great food, play in the Fountain of Rings and attend live concerts.

Truck Driving Resources for Traveling through Georgia

Visit www.truckstopsonline.com and search for truck stops in Georgia so you know where to stop for all the amenities you need along your route. Then, remain up-to-date with current road conditions and travel alerts by checking the Georgia Department of Transportation website often.

To learn more about truck driving in Georgia, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, find us on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook and YouTube to stay up-to-date with the latest transportation industry news.

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Attention Recruiters, it’s More Than Just Miles and Pay for Truck Drivers

While money and miles go hand in hand in the transportation industry, truck drivers often say other factors attract them to a new carrier. As a recruiter looking to bring in new High turnover rates are a huge problem for transportation industry recruiters. Find out what truck drivers are looking for to appeal to more recruits.drivers during a time of high freight demand, changing driver demographics and tighter regulations, pay attention to these other benefits that appeal to truck drivers.

  • Respect and Recognition: According to surveys conducted by third-party companies, truck drivers often rank respect higher on their list of priorities than pay when it comes to staying with their carrier or finding a new one. Offering incentives for good performance helps drivers feel more appreciated. If you’re not sure what to offer, don’t be afraid to ask your drivers what they want.
  • Home Time: With new hours of service regulations restricting how much time drivers can spend on the road, more of them place home time as a higher priority. After all, if you can’t be making money, why not spend that time at home with family instead of waiting for the 34-hour restart to end? This means many truck drivers want local instead of regional or over-the-road jobs these days.
  • Benefits: If pay is equal between two carriers, the one that offers better benefits is the one a truck driver will choose.
  • New Equipment: Drivers and long-haul employees in particular spend lots of time in the cab. New equipment outfitted with the latest technology is very appealing to new recruits, especially those on the younger side.
  • Company Reputation: If your company has a good history of keeping its promises to both drivers and customers, your reputation will flourish. Making a good name for your company is an important part of attracting new applicants.
  • Sign-on bonus and recruitment rewards: Changing jobs is stressful, so truck drivers often keep an eye out for carriers that offer significant sign-on bonuses. Offering rewards for drivers who recruit new members to the team also lightens your load and encourages drivers to spread the word about their positive experience with the carrier.

The Bottom Line

The biggest takeaway for recruiters is this: while pay and miles certainly matter, they’re not the only factors you should consider if you want to improve driver recruitment and retention rates. In fact, your carrier’s ability to deliver these benefits should become a major part of your recruiting campaign.

Learn more about what truck drivers want from their carriers by visiting the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, find us on TwitterLinkedIn, Facebook and YouTube to stay up-to-date with the latest transportation industry news.

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Trucking Industry News | Covenant Transport Introduces New Pay Package

Company offers one of the largest guarantee programs in the country

June 3, 2015 (Chattanooga, Tenn.) – Covenant Transport, known in the trucking industry as a leader in expedited team freight, announced yesterday the introduction of a new pay package for its hazmat OTR team drivers. The pay package, which includes a $1,000 Covenant Transport is introducing a new pay package for its hazmat OTR team drivers, believed to be the largest guaranteed-minimum program in the industry.per week minimum guarantee for professional drivers with at least one year of experience, went into effect June 1, 2015 for the more than 1,000 hazmat team drivers currently working for the company. This is believed to be the largest guaranteed-minimum program in the industry.

“We’ve been working for the past year to make sure everything is in place to guarantee our hazmat OTR team drivers a minimum of $1,000 per week each and every week,” said Rob Hatchett, vice president of recruiting for Covenant. “It is a huge step for a large carrier to put their money where their mouth is in this way. We are so confident in our freight network, which has allowed us to offer such a generous guarantee to such a large number of drivers.”

Hazmat team drivers at Covenant will typically earn an average of $1,200-1,300 weekly, but the guaranteed weekly minimum pay will allow these drivers to know the absolute minimum they will earn each week. According to Hatchett, drivers also want consistency of pay, and Covenant is willing to step up and guarantee $1,000 weekly, even during the uncommon weeks when professional drivers have to battle weather, non-ideal road conditions or equipment issues. We are looking forward to paying these additional funds because it shows our drivers we truly want to maximize their income,” Hatchett said.

The minimum guarantee for hazmat team drivers with less than a year of experience is $850 per week. The new pay package also features guaranteed home time, company-paid hazmat endorsement, an improvement in earned home time to two days earned for 12 worked and starting pay for new professional trainers increased to 72 cents per mile. Covenant’s guaranteed home time policy also pays drivers $100 for each day they are late for their scheduled home time. In addition, the company also hires individual drivers without their hazmat certification, pays for them to get certified and has an analytic matching program to pair them up with a compatible team driving partner. Covenant’s hazmat team driver compensation package makes it possible for professional drivers to earn much more as a team than if they were running solo.

“This is an exciting time at Covenant Transport because we are growing,” said Hatchett. “We are up almost 200 professional drivers over this time last year, and it’s largely because our pay has gone up so much. We understand there is a driver shortage happening in the industry, but Covenant has been growing and that makes it very exciting around here.”

Covenant Transport is currently hiring in all 48 states with orientations held every Monday in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Dallas, Texas, and Los Angeles, California. For more information about career opportunities at Covenant, visit www.driveforcovenant.com or call 866-609-3620.

About Covenant Transport

Founded in 1986, Covenant Transport, Inc. began with only 25 tractors and 50 trailers. Today, after nearly 30 years in the long-haul industry, the company is a leader in the industry in job satisfaction. Covenant Transport, a subsidiary of the Covenant Transportation Group, Inc., places a high priority on its CSA scores and provides its professional drivers with well-maintained, late model equipment, top-notch facilities and superior training to give them excellent tools to thrive and operate safely.

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Benefits of Truck Driving Over the Road

If you’re thinking of a career in truck driving, you have a few important decisions to make. Will you be a company driver or owner-operator? Do you want to drive solo or as a team? truck-drivingWill you choose to be a local, regional or over-the-road truck driver?

As you do your research, be sure to take the benefits of OTR, or long-haul truck driving, into account. Just a few are:

  • Get paid to travel the country.
  • Earn more money the more miles you drive.
  • Enjoy unparalleled job security in an industry with severe worker shortages.
  • Have freedom to work on your own schedule instead of having a boss breathe down your neck.
  • Climb the pay scale quickly for maximum earnings in just a few years.

Once you decide truck driving over the road is right for you, you still need to decide which type of OTR career to choose. Here’s a look at three of your options.

General OTR

All over-the-road opportunities share some general characteristics. They require you to spend weeks at a time on the road. A typical schedule might be three weeks on the road with one week off to spend at home. Routes are paid by the mile and most drivers travel thousands of miles per week for great earning potential.

Coast-to-Coast Dedicated

Dedicated routes come in many forms, including a long haul coast-to-coast version. A career working a dedicated route means you transport goods between the same locations on a set schedule. It’s a desirable option if you enjoy predictability and want a personal relationship with the companies you transport goods for.

Expedited Truck Driving

You can expect to earn more per mile in this category because the cargo is expedited, meaning it needs to reach its destination fast. Expedited loads include perishable goods, flowers and delicacies such as live lobster.

Your schedule as an expedited driver could be quite erratic, with hours or even days between loads. Then, you’re expected to drop everything and take a job at a moment’s notice. The unpredictability may be worth it though, thanks to the extra mileage pay. You’ll likely be an owner-operator if you drive expedited routes, so you can take whichever loads you prefer.

For more information about over-the-road truck driving jobs, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for the latest trucking industry news.

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Hot Weather Truck Driving Tips

You may think of winter as the most challenging time to be a truck driver. Icy roads, poor visibility and blowing snow make for treacherous traveling conditions. But now that winter is just a memory, it’s time to consider the effects of hot weather on truck driving. To Extreme heat can be unhealthy and dangerous. Protect yourself and ensure you make deliveries safely with these hot weather truck driving tips.ensure you stay happy, healthy and safe on the road this summer, follow these tips.

Stay Hydrated

It’s important to drink plenty of liquid any time of year, but especially in the heat of summer. Water is best, but fruit juice, milk and tea are other great options for staying hydrated. Don’t overdo it on coffee, soda and energy drinks, since these can actually dehydrate you.

Lower Your Stress Level

Truck driving for a living can be stressful at times, especially when you’re hot and irritable. To help keep your stress levels down, plan your route ahead of time and have a plan B in case of storms or road construction. Avoid heavily trafficked areas at rush hour and keep your road rage in check. The last thing you need is to aggravate other irritated drivers with rude hand gestures.

Beat the Sun

Look into having your truck’s windows tinted. This filters out much of the light and makes your A/C more efficient. You might also want to slather on sunscreen since nothing’s worse than a painful sunburn while truck driving.

Keep Cool

The cab may be air conditioned, but you’ll be tempted to rush through fueling and making pre-trip inspections if you’re overheated. Keep a damp towel in your cooler and drape it around your neck when you spend time outside the cab. You’ll stay cool and comfortable until it’s time to retreat to the air-conditioned cab once again.

Give Extra Attention to Pre-Trip Inspections

You should always perform thorough checks before starting your route, but in extreme heat, it’s important to double check certain areas every time you hit the road, including:

  • Tire air pressure and mounting pressure
  • Condition of belts and hoses
  • Engine oil level
  • Gauges
  • Coolant level

By implementing these hot weather truck driving tips, you’ll enjoy spending this summer behind the wheel. For more information about truck driving jobs, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for the latest trucking industry news.

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Carrier of the Month | Arnold Transportation

Far too often in the transportation industry, drivers aren’t treated fairly. They’re forced to stay on the road away from their families for weeks at a time. They’re lumped into a group carrier-of-the-monthinstead of being treated as individuals.

Arnold Transportation, Jiggy Jobs’ ­carrier of the month, does things a little differently. Regional jobs get drivers home more often, and dispatchers know their drivers by name, not as a number. It’s this unmatched driver care and attention that remains the foundation of Arnold Transportation to this day.

Company History

Arnold Transportation has been driving regional since 1932. The company’s expertise lies in delivering dry van goods from the Northeast to the Southwest. The corporate office is located in Grand Prairie, Texas.

Driving Careers

Many career opportunities are available with this ­carrier of the month:

  • Company Drivers average 2,000 miles or more per week and haul industrial and consumer products. A new pay package allows company drivers to earn up to $0.48 per mile.
  • Owner-Operators are paired up with contractor-friendly freight, absolutely none of which comes from brokers. Fuel discounts and maintenance plans ensure you make a great profit for your business.
  • Recent CDL School Graduates can participate in Arnold Transportation’s Student Finishing Training Program to jumpstart their truck-driving career. Recent grads are paired with their own Driver Trainer to guide them every step of the way.
  • Driver Trainers play a vital role in helping new drivers begin a career as a professional truck driver. Trainers can expect great home time, access to late-model equipment and exceptional regional lanes.
  • Lease-Purchase Contractors have the opportunity to become owner-operators. The lease-purchase program benefits drivers with quality home time and $1 per mile, whether loaded or empty.

To learn more about this ­carrier of the month, or to apply for a driving career with Arnold Transportation, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more trucking industry news.

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Attracting Younger Drivers by Changing the Image of the Trucking Industry

Currently, the trucking industry is in an interesting position. According to Datamark Inc., the driver shortage at the end of 2014 was as high as 30,000 positions. If this trend trucking-industrycontinues, the driver shortage could reach over 100,000 by 2016.

Many factors have combined to create such a staggering shortage in the trucking industry. One is that strict federal safety regulations require drivers to take frequent breaks, meaning more drivers are needed to deliver the same goods as in the past. Another is that the economy and housing markets are improving, meaning more goods need to be transported.

The third reason for the shortage is that older drivers are retiring and leaving thousands of vacant positions in their wake. Younger drivers have a negative perception of the trucking industry, so they’re not filling these openings fast enough. Their image of a truck driver looks like something from Convoy or Smokey and the Bandit.

In order to break the current driver shortage trend, it’s imperative for carriers to transform the perceived image of truck driving from dirty jeans and cut off t-shirts to a professional career with the chance to make a good living. As you reach out to the younger generation, focus on the following points in your recruiting materials:

  • Truck drivers get to travel from coast to coast and see sites most people only dream of.
  • Unlike traditional office workers, truck drivers aren’t stuck in a boring cubicle. Their view changes every day, and work becomes an adventure.
  • Truck driving comes with competitive pay and good benefits.
  • Recruits don’t need a college degree to get started and work their way up to the top-earning bracket.
  • Because of the shortage, drivers get their pick of which carrier to work for.
  • Owner-operators have the chance to make their own schedule, take whatever routes they want and make an excellent living as a business owner.
  • Team driving is a great opportunity to stay on the go and earn higher wages with a spouse.
  • Cabs are filled with the latest advanced technology in the trucking industry to maintain open communication, monitor the engine and make life as a truck driver easier and more productive.

Attracting the younger generation doesn’t have to be difficult; you just need to know what benefits of being a truck driver appeal to them most. For more information about the trucking industry, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for the latest news.

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Truck Driving in West Virginia

It’s known as Wild, Wonderful West Virginia. Some even call it “Almost Heaven.” If your truck driving route takes you through the Mountain State, make the most of your time truck-drivingthere by visiting some of the top 10 tourist attractions.

Places to See While Truck Driving in West Virginia

  • Capitol Music Hall: If you love live musical performances, this attraction is certainly worth your time. Check the calendar and see who’s performing while you’re in the area.
  • Snowshoe Mountain: What would the Mountain State be without a ski resort? Voted one of the top 10 resorts in the East, Snowshoe Mountain offers snow tubing, pools and play zones as well as challenging terrain for experienced skiers.
  • The Town of Harpers Ferry: History buffs and thrill seekers alike love Harpers Ferry. Visit museums, take tours, go hiking or raft down the Potomac or Shenandoah Rivers.
  • Tamarack: Known as West Virginia’s Artisan Retail Center, Tamarack is the perfect place to shop for handmade souvenirs for your family back home.
  • New River Gorge Bridge: Traveling through West Virginia’s mountainous terrain is a challenge for those who live there, but the New River Gorge Bridge solves this problem as a beautiful work of art. A Bridge Walk Tour lets you enjoy breathtaking views at the most photographed site in the state.
  • Monongahela National Forest: If you’re a nature lover, you can’t miss out on the chance to hike or drive through this scenic 900,000-acre forest.
  • Summersville Lake: This unique vacation destination is home to the only working lighthouse in West Virginia. You’ll certainly want to take a tour during your visit.
  • South Charleston Memorial Ice Arena: This spectacular venue for hockey games is a site you must visit if you love the sport. Cheer on your favorite team or take to the ice yourself for a unique exercising opportunity during your time off.
  • Stonewall Jackson Lake: Looking for a place to unwind between truck driving routes? This four-diamond rated resort is the perfect place to try out the 18-hole golf course, go swimming or take a winery tour.
  • Blackwater Falls State Park: As one of the most famous tourist attractions in West Virginia, this state park gives you the chance to go hiking, boating and fishing as well explore the museum and historical center.

Truck Driving Resources for Traveling through West Virginia

Visit www.truckstopsonline.com and search for truck stops in West Virginia so you know where to stop for all the amenities you need along your route. Then, remain up-to-date with current road conditions and travel alerts by checking the West Virginia Department of Transportation website often.

To learn more about truck driving in West Virginia, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more trucking industry news.

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Spring Means Truck Driving Through Road Construction Zones

You’re probably excited to put winter truck driving conditions behind you, at least for the next several months. However, with warmer temperatures comes more roadwork. Orangetruck-driving construction cones pop up like daisies all over the nation’s interstates. The need to repair potholes, widen roads, repave areas and make other improvements is dire now that spring is here.

While the Federal Highway Administration reports work zone fatalities have dropped nearly every year since 2005, even one death is one too many. Follow certain safety tips while truck driving through construction zones to make it safer for everyone:

  • Follow the directions on roadway signs. Temporary signage is usually set up as you approach work zones. You might be alerted of closed lanes ahead, reduced speed or closed shoulders. Heed these signs. Continue driving at the posted work zone speed limit until you see a sign specifically stating you have left the zone.
  • Remain on the lookout for aggressive drivers. They may attempt to pass you before you enter the work zone and might not use their turn signal when changing lanes. Slowing down to let them through could prevent an accident.
  • Proceed with caution. Cones and barriers are meant to guide the flow of traffic, but they provide little protection for workers. Keep an eye out for personnel near the roadway and steer clear of them.
  • Leave extra room. Construction zones are full of unpredictable debris and hazards that could require drivers to slam on their brakes. To prevent a rear-end collision, never follow the car ahead of you too closely.
  • Keep your cool. As you enter a work zone, realize that delays are inevitable. Stay calm and don’t rush. Remain aware of your surroundings and put distractions away.
  • Take alternate routes if possible. Before you even hit the pavement, plan your route to avoid truck driving through work zones whenever possible. A little pre-planning helps you avoid the stress, hazards and delays associated with road construction.

To learn more truck driving safety tips, visit the Jiggy Jobs website. Then, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ for more trucking industry news.

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